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Brian Kendrick talks about what current WWE stars are doing wrong backstage

Brian Kendrick speaks about today's wrestlers.

Brian Kendrick explained what most of the current crop of young WWE Superstars are doing wrong backstage.

On a recent edition of The Steve Austin Show, Brian Kendrick revealed what, according to him, is wrong in today’s up-and-comers’ approach.

The 38 year old added that instead of sticking around at events, watching matches and learning, today’s WWE Superstars prefer to leave the arena if they aren’t on the card or booked for a show.

Kendrick has performed in several notable professional wrestling promotions including ROH (Ring Of Honor), Impact Wrestling and WWE.

He presently performs in the WWE Cruiserweight division, prominently featuring on 205 Live.

Speaking about the problem with today’s WWE talent, Brian Kendrick explained-

“The problem is, they get back to the locker room. They have their sweat and their opponents sweat on them. They are not showering, they are looking their name up on Twitter. When they can hear all of this positive feedback from fans, who cares what a Dean Malenko has to say”

Furthermore, it’s noteworthy that today’s scenario is way different as compared to the time Kendrick was starting out in the WWE- the early 2000s- when the promotion had experts such as the Undertaker, JBL and Eddie Guerrero keeping a stern watch over the roster, making sure all the younger guys were watching as many matches as possible and trying to improve their pro-wrestling skills.

Brian Kendrick has always been one to speak his mind, and this time was no different. Today’s talent is without a doubt influenced by the Twitterati and what fans post about them online.

Now, while it’d be wrong of us to judge today’s generation who are be swayed to such an extent courtesy the internet, much like Kendrick insinuated, one ought to listen to the actual pro-wrestling experts at one’s disposal rather than regard what the Internet Wrestling community says as the be-all and end-all of one’s career.