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Home » TNA News » Eric Bischoff on TNA’s Current Position, His Son Garett, His Role Backstage and Thoughts on The IWC

Eric Bischoff recently spoke with Bob Kapur of SLAM! Wrestling. Here are some highlights from the interview:

TNA’s current position:
“As someone who is very clearly associated with and very much invested in it emotionally, I want to see it succeed, obviously. I think the business, and the television business, is an extremely competitive one. It’s difficult for a lot of people and for a lot of networks. We’re competing with general entertainment, we’re competing for extremely valuable real estate on a very important television network that’s owned by a very important media conglomerate. But I think there is a ton of potential in TNA. It’s uniquely positioned to grow, and to become much larger in many ways than it is right now.”

His role behind the scenes in TNA:
“My role doesn’t extend to the hiring and firing or recruiting. That’s the business side of TNA’s business, and I’m not involved in that. My partner Jason Hervey and I are the Executive Producers of Impact. Essentially, my role is: to oversee the creative side of the production; to be involved in post-production as is necessary; to execute the creative direction and vision of each episode; to work closely with the network to make sure the TNA side of the equation understands the network’s goals; and to be the liaison for TNA on the production side of things so that the network understands what our challenges are, and where we’re going, and what we’re trying to do. My involvement is really limited to the show itself. I’m not involved in many aspects of the business that the internet would suggest I’m involved in.”

His son Garett Bischoff becoming a pro wrestler:
“I’m extremely proud of him. I’m very, very proud. It was a goal of his, something that he’d wanted to do since he was extremely young, as a child growing up – which I didn’t really find out about until just a few years ago when he broke into the business. I’m very proud of him for working hard to do what he’s needed to do. Clearly he had an advantage in getting into the business, I think everybody understands that, and I’d be lying if I said I didn’t think that was a factor. But he also has had to overcome a lot because of who he is, and because of who I am. And he’s handled that really well. But there’s a part of me that knows – and I tell him this – that this is an extremely difficult business, more difficult now than it’s ever been. There’s really only one big place to work, and TNA is what TNA is and where they are. It’s a tough career choice when there are really only two car manufacturers and one’s in mass production.”

His thoughts on the Internet Wrestling Community:
“Unfortunately, the internet, the dirt sheets, the blogs, whatever you want to call them – a lot of them are operating with partial information. And that hurts a lot of the different parties involved. It hurts the talent in certain respects; it hurts the business in certain respects; it hurts the credibility of the people who write about things that they don’t fully understand. It’s unfortunate, but that’s the nature of the business.”

  • ddfindl

    Yeah, no problem. I see what you’re saying though. I don’t dislike TNA or anything but obviously whatevers going on in the back just isn’t working out. You know if they could bring in more money somehow and keep a lot of these guys on the payroll, that’d be awesome, but like I said, right now they need to cut WAY back and focus on quality, substantive wrestling or Dixie’s daddy’s company might want nothing to do with the company pretty soon.

  • ddfindl

    Yeah, no problem. I see what you’re saying though. I don’t dislike TNA or anything but obviously whatevers going on in the back just isn’t working out. You know if they could bring in more money somehow and keep a lot of these guys on the payroll, that’d be awesome, but like I said, right now they need to cut WAY back and focus on quality, substantive wrestling or Dixie’s daddy’s company might want nothing to do with the company pretty soon.

  • Chris E.

    Thanks for taking the time to respond, ddfindl. Makes sense.
    I kind of like the stables. I think Russo was the cause of a lot of unusual choices that didnt make sense. Hogan/ Bischoff bringing in the old WWE guys (Val Venis, The Nasty Boys etc..) was a misfire. I was disappointed to hear that Pritchard was let go, as I thought things were getting better with him on board.

  • Chris E.

    Thanks for taking the time to respond, ddfindl. Makes sense.
    I kind of like the stables. I think Russo was the cause of a lot of unusual choices that didnt make sense. Hogan/ Bischoff bringing in the old WWE guys (Val Venis, The Nasty Boys etc..) was a misfire. I was disappointed to hear that Pritchard was let go, as I thought things were getting better with him on board.

  • ddfindl

    TNA has always had solid matches, and Hogan/Bischoff era story-writing is nothing but Russo-style swerves and stables galore. All Hogan/Bischoff did that wasn’t being done prior, other than adding themselves and their kids to the mix, is bring in a little additional revenue from sources outside of merch, ticket sales and ppv buys (mostly advertising) and use their likeliness to garner attention to the company…and I give them credit for that; however, they apparently haven’t been making wise financial decisions if people aren’t getting paid on time and they’re having to let people go. They have this mentality that if they spend big money they’ll get big returns (a new set, star-power, higher production costs), but its not working out to well. They could hire like 4 or 5 talented guys from the indies at the cost they’re paying Hogan.

  • ddfindl

    TNA has always had solid matches, and Hogan/Bischoff era story-writing is nothing but Russo-style swerves and stables galore. All Hogan/Bischoff did that wasn’t being done prior, other than adding themselves and their kids to the mix, is bring in a little additional revenue from sources outside of merch, ticket sales and ppv buys (mostly advertising) and use their likeliness to garner attention to the company…and I give them credit for that; however, they apparently haven’t been making wise financial decisions if people aren’t getting paid on time and they’re having to let people go. They have this mentality that if they spend big money they’ll get big returns (a new set, star-power, higher production costs), but its not working out to well. They could hire like 4 or 5 talented guys from the indies at the cost they’re paying Hogan.

  • Chris E.

    I don’t understand the thinking TNA IMPACT isn’t doing well. It boggles my mind. It has been more cohesive that it was years ago. The Hogan era started off badly but seems to have turned around. There has always been solid matches, but now the storytelling make sense. You have a 2 hour show that competes (in my area) with 8 hours per week of WWE programming. There is no way it will draw numbers comparable to WWE, so I’m not sure what they are measuring the success (or lack of) against?

  • Chris E.

    I don’t understand the thinking TNA IMPACT isn’t doing well. It boggles my mind. It has been more cohesive that it was years ago. The Hogan era started off badly but seems to have turned around. There has always been solid matches, but now the storytelling make sense. You have a 2 hour show that competes (in my area) with 8 hours per week of WWE programming. There is no way it will draw numbers comparable to WWE, so I’m not sure what they are measuring the success (or lack of) against?

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